Tiffany Haddish Will Be The First Black Woman To Host MTV Movie Awards

Tiffany Haddish is making history left and right. 

The “Girls Trip” actress announced on Thursday that she will be hosting the 2018 MTV Movie & TV Awards in Los Angeles on Monday, June 18. Haddish, who made history last November by becoming the first black female stand-up comedian to host “Saturday Night Live,” is making history again as the first black woman to host the award show. The last female host was Amy Schumer in 2015. 

Haddish announced the news in a video on Instagram. “It’s gonna be off the chain! Because you know why? I’m hosting!” Haddish says in the video. “And you know what that means ― it’s gonna be hilarious.”

MTV released a statement shortly after Haddish’s announcement, writing that the actress, comedian and author is “quickly establishing herself as one of the most sought-after actresses and comedic talents in television and film.” 

Haddish, who many believe should have been an Oscar contender, has been on fire as of late.

After her hilarious acting in “Girls Trip,” she released a New York Times best-seller titled The Last Black Unicorn. She recently made waves as the face of Groupon, appearing in the brand’s 2018 Super Bowl ad. The actress is also starring in the upcoming TBS sitcom “The Last O.G.” alongside Tracy Morgan. 

The categories and nominees for the award show will be announced at a later date. 

The MTV Movie & TV Awards will air on Monday, June 18, at 9 p.m. EST. 

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/tiffany-haddish-will-be-the-first-black-woman-to-host-mtv-movie-awards_us_5a901b24e4b0ee6416a26f23

Walmart and Rakuten partner on grocery delivery in Japan, Kobo e-books and audiobooks in U.S.

Walmart today announced a major expansion in terms of its global e-commerce presence: the retailer is entering a strategic partnership with Tokyo-based Rakuten, which will see the companies collaborating on the launch of a new online grocery service in Japan, and the sale of e-readers, audiobooks and e-books in the U.S., via Rakuten-owned Kobo.

The strategic alliance is one that has two of the world’s largest e-commerce retailers joining forcing in an effort to combat Amazon, and is yet another example of how Walmart is using large-scale partnerships to aid in that battle. For example, Walmart last year teamed up with Google in order to have an entry point in the voice-assisted shopping space, by way of Google Home smart speakers – an area where Amazon’s Alexa has mopped up market share.

In this new partnership, Walmart says it and Rakuten will co-create an online grocery service in Japan that will launch in the third quarter of 2018. The service will be operated by Rakuten and Seiyu GK, a Walmart subsidiary, and will be called “Rakuten Seiyu Netsuper.”

Walmart, via Seiyu, has operated a grocery delivery business in Japan since 2000. This new co-branded service will replace that, the company says.

Once live later this year, some customers’ orders will continue to be fulfilled by their local Seiyu store, as before. But depending on their geography, other customers’ orders may come from a new, dedicated fulfillment center operated by Walmart and Rakuten. The center, which is an existing building Walmart owns, will be exclusively used for online grocery.

Walmart today also operates an online grocery business in the U.S., where customers can shop online and pay, then pull up to a designated parking spot for curbside pickup when their order is ready. The option to take delivery is available for an additional fee, but Walmart hands off that part of the operation to third-party partners, like Uber.

However, in all other markets where Walmart operates online grocery – including Japan, the U.K., China, Canada, Mexico, Chile, Argentina, and India – the service is focused on home delivery. This will be the case with Rakuten Seiyu Netsuper, as well. Groceries will also continue to be delivered to homes using existing local delivery companies, Walmart tells us.

Another difference between the U.S.-based pickup service and Japan’s delivery service is that Rakuten Seiyu Netsuper will offer pre-prepared meal kits, as well as partially prepared foods and other convenience-focused items like pre-cut vegetables, in addition to its selection of fresh produce and other consumables. Some items from Rakuten’s Ichiba marketplace – which has over 93 million registered members – will be available, too, including gourmet foods.

Rakuten will additionally help craft the website for the new online grocery service, which will take advantage of its e-commerce technology, including big data and A.I., in order to personalize the merchandise offerings.

“Rakuten is a strong e-commerce business and we’re excited to collaborate with the top
online shopping destination in Japan,” said Walmart president and CEO Doug McMillon, in a statement. “Here in Japan and everywhere we operate, we’re constantly exploring new ways to make every day easier for customers by offering great experiences in stores, online, via mobile—no matter how customers want to shop.”

The other significant initiative to emerge from this alliance is the addition of Kobo’s e-book and audiobook selection to Walmart’s website – a clear attempt to unseat Amazon Kindle’s dominance in e-readers and e-books, and Amazon-owned Audible’s dominance in audiobooks.

Kobo will bring nearly 6 million audiobooks and e-book titles from hundreds of thousands of authors to Walmart, which will sell them on Walmart.com starting sometime later this year. (E-books will arrive first, followed by audiobooks.)

Walmart will also sell digital book cards in stores, as well as Kobo’s e-readers.

Kobo is the second-largest e-reader manufacturer worldwide, but never became a household name here in the U.S. However, the company has been fairly innovative with its hardware, offering premium versions and even a waterproof model years before Amazon did with Oasis. If anything could take on Kindle, it’s more likely to be a Walmart-backed Kobo rather than a Nook

The companies haven’t yet decided which of Walmart’s stores will get which e-reader models, as the assortment details are still being worked out.

The two companies will also release a co-branded Walmart/Kobo e-reading app for iOS and Android, as their alternative offering to Amazon’s Kindle app, as well as a desktop app. The new app will replace the existing Kobo app that’s live on app stores, but the companies couldn’t detail how the transition process will work for existing U.S. Kobo users.

Similar to how Amazon lets consumers choose the format of the book they want to purchase while shopping, Walmart says Kobo’s product selection will also be “fully integrated” into its Walmart.com shopping site. That means when customers find the book they want to buy, they’ll be able to choose from the physical book, an e-book or an audiobook version from one place.

Walmart says it will use the power of its physical retail presence to get this e-book offering off the ground, noting that its stores see over 140 million weekly customers who will be able to buy e-readers and digital book cards.

Amazon, meanwhile, has been moving in the other direction – it already has the e-book empire others want to topple, so now its focus is on launching Amazon bookstores that put physical books in front of shoppers, too. But unlike Walmart, the Amazon Books retail stores are only open in select (generally urban) markets at this time. The bookstore chain is part of Amazon’s larger efforts to establish a brick-and-mortar footprint to rival Walmart’s, in fact – efforts that include its acquisition of grocer Whole Foods and its new, cashier-less Amazon Go stores.

“Kobo has been very successful in working with market-leading book retailers around the world to provide a very competitive experience in the e-book space,” Rakuten Kobo CEO Michael Tamblyn told TechCrunch.

“We’re very excited to come to the U.S. and bring e-books and audiobooks to Walmart, and take advantage of the scale that a market leader and a leading bookseller like Walmart can provide,” he added.

Read more: https://techcrunch.com/2018/01/25/walmart-and-rakuten-partner-on-grocery-delivery-in-japan-kobo-e-books-and-audiobooks-in-u-s/

Radical Revolution: The fight for animal liberation by Stephen Saunders

Book Summary

Veganism is more than a healthy lifestyle choice—it’s a moral imperative. Society continues to engage in widespread animal oppression, slaughtering billions of helpless living creatures each year. Vivisectionists and researchers torture and kill in the name of science, while corporations and governments plunder nature’s last remaining treasures.

Author, vegan, and dietician Stephen Saunders, RD, presents a compelling and sometimes controversial argument in favor of animal liberation. Drawing on historical examples of human oppression and comparing them to the plight of animals, Saunders reveals the hypocrisy of those who fight for human rights while ignoring speciesism.

Saunders offers a vision of animal oppression from the point of view of the victim. His irrefutable evidence positions veganism as the optimal diet from the viewpoints of ethics, the environment, and health.

Domination over the animal kingdom acts as the foundation for domination over women, ethnic minorities, and the socially disadvantaged. Unless we address and conquer speciesism, nothing will change—indeed, our place on this planet will become ever more precarious. Saunders makes an unapologetic call to arms. There can be no compromise or negotiation when fighting for animal liberation—but there may be justice.

Amazon Link – http://amzn.to/2npHQJZ

Kirkus Review

A debut book contends that humanity can save itself through veganism.

These days, it seems people are facing more existential crises than they have time to contemplate: climate change, environmental degradation, income inequality, sexism, racism, and plain old violence. “I believe that man can change,” writes Saunders in the introduction to this work. “But it will take a revolution of empathy, compassion, and mercy, not toward the human species but toward the creatures with whom we share this earth—the animals.” According to the author, humans’ carnivorous behavior is their true original sin, the one that underlies all the others. The torture and slaughter of animals are injustices that people have rationalized, making it easier for them to defend other systems of subjugation, like patriarchy, white supremacy, and capitalism. Saunders takes readers through a wide range of disciplines and eras to make his case, exploring the origins of hunting and eating meat, contemporary research on what nutrients people need (and from what sources they are available), and how veganism builds on the values of earlier radical groups like the Romantics, the Luddites, the Transcendentalists, and abolitionists. Drawing from science, literature, and politics, the author maintains that the next stage of human freedom is to untether the race from the greatest vestige of its unenlightened past: the flesh of other creatures. Saunders demonstrates a good deal of erudition, but his tone is often abrasive and hyperbolic, as when he attempts to discredit high-protein, low-carb diets: “You may lose weight in the short-term on a low-carb diet if your goal is to fit into a skinnier casket.” With his cherry-picked nutritional studies, jeremiads against capitalism, and fondness for quoting Thoreau, the author will likely remind readers of a particularly dogmatic undergraduate. That is unfortunate, since this approach obscures his most enthralling and persuasive argument—that living off the killing of animals decreases people’s empathy. Tone aside, there is much here that should give the progressive meat eater pause. The book is a reminder that while vegans may sometimes sound patronizing to carnivores, their complaints about the food system cannot be ignored forever.

An intriguing, if somewhat heavy-handed, argument for veganism.

https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/stephen-saunders/radical-revolution/

Author Bio

Stephen graduated from Plattsburgh State University with a B.S. in food and nutrition and then went on to complete an internship at the University of Delaware to become a registered dietitian. Stephen also graduated from Long Island University with a B.S. in biology. Stephen has worked as a registered dietitian for over 10 years including working as a clinical dietitian in several hospitals for over 10 years. He is board certified as a nutrition support specialist for critically ill patients. Stephen is a public speaker for health and veganism.

Stephen presents a compelling and sometimes controversial argument in favor of animal liberation. Drawing on historical examples of human oppression and comparing them to the plight of animals, Stephen reveals the hypocrisy of those who fight for human rights while ignoring speciesism. Stephen offers a vision of animal oppression from the point of view of the victim. His irrefutable evidence positions veganism as the optimal diet from the viewpoints of ethics, the environment, and health.

Doctor shares dying children’s wishes

Image copyright Alastair McAlpine
Image caption The message of love, appreciation and ice cream came across loud and clear

When a palliative paediatrician in South Africa saw too many negative stories appear on his Twitter feed, he decided to share some positive, inspiring thoughts of the terminally ill children in his care.

Alastair McAlpine, from Cape Town, tweeted: “I asked some of my terminal paediatric palliative care patients what they had enjoyed in life, and what gave it meaning. Kids can be so wise, y’know. Here are some of the responses.”

Dr McAlpine told the BBC he wanted to write something uplifting, and was overwhelmed when he saw hundreds of responses to his tweet, which has been liked more than 10,000 times.

At first he tried to respond to each comment. He said: “It’s extraordinary. I believe in thanking people when they say something nice, but there were just too many for me to reply to all of them.”

None of the children, aged between four and nine, said that they wished they had watched more television, or spent more time on Facebook.

Animals played a huge part in their lives as they enjoyed talking about their pets. Dr McAlpine tweeted examples: “I love Rufus, his funny bark makes me laugh; I love when Ginny snuggles up to me at night and purrs; I was happiest riding Jake on the beach.”

Dr McAlpine trained in palliative care in May 2017 after he saw a huge gap in paediatric care.

“When it came to kids dying, it seemed we weren’t prepared for what to do. The best part of my job now is that I get to meet these extraordinary children and families. I walk a special road with them,” he says.

“As horrible as it is when a child dies, one of the best rewards is a dignified and pain-free death. If I can make their lives slightly less bad, it’s worthwhile. That keeps me going.”

One person who was impressed with the paediatrician’s tweets, was Canadian obstetrician, Dr Jennifer Gunter, who has frequently written about Gwyneth Paltrow’s advice on the actress’s lifestyle website.

“I was pretty star-struck when I saw Jennifer’s comment. My partner will probably roll her eyes at me. I think she’s liked a grand total of two of my tweets.”

Some people online asked how the paediatrician copes with working with terminally ill children, while others just admired both the medical staff and the children:

After a child’s death, parents often continue a relationship with their child’s doctor, which Dr McAlpine says is a “huge compliment.”

From his online thread, the children also worry about their parents as one of his tweets read: “Hope mum will be OK; Dad mustn’t worry, he’ll see me again soon.”

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All of the children loved ice cream and books. But many wished they had spent less time worrying about what others thought, and about losing their hair or how their scars looked.

It’s no surprise that kindness, laughter, toys and family were all very much valued by the children. As his threads unfolded and the comments poured in, Dr McAlpine left this take-home message: “Be kind. Read more books. Spend time with our family. Crack jokes. Go to the beach. Hug your dog. Tell that special person you love them… and eat ice cream.”

Working in palliative care can be heart-wrenching, but Dr McAlpine says he works with some “lovely people” at Paedspal Cape Town – a programme providing care for terminally ill children.

“It’s an extraordinary team. We believe in a holistic approach to care.

“The negativity can get me down. But I glean inspiration from the parents of these children.”

Read more: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-42909326